Shit That I Come Across in New York

simonesubalgallery:

Brian O’Doherty: Subal : The New Yorker

Brian O’Doherty’s ‘Connecting the…’ has been reviewed by The New Yorker!

simonesubalgallery:

Brian O’Doherty: Subal : The New Yorker

Brian O’Doherty’s ‘Connecting the…’ has been reviewed by The New Yorker!

transitmaps:

Recreated Historical Map: East Berlin S-Bahn, 1980 by Maxwell Roberts
What does noted alternate transit map designer Maxwell Roberts do when he comes across a rare postcard version of the East Berlin S-Bahn network from 1980?
He takes a photo of it, and then recreates it using modern design tools, of course.
Remember that the S-Bahn was still operated by the GDR even in West Berlin, although West Berliners boycotted the service for the most part, preferring their own U-Bahn network. The Staatsgrenze (state border) totally dominates even this supposedly “unified” service map, and it’s clear in a number of places where the border has cut a rail line neatly in two. The only place where interchange between the two halves of the system was even remotely possible was at Friedrichstrasse, and even then only after rigorous border screening.
The map itself is quite lovely — much nicer than this more well-known map from around the same time — with bright rainbow colours, restrained European typography (an East German alternate cut of Futura, as the original typeface was not available there at the time!), and nice mode differentiation. 
Our rating: A superb restoration of an obscure but excellent map, both design-wise and historically. Five stars!

Source: The Atlantic Cities

transitmaps:

Recreated Historical Map: East Berlin S-Bahn, 1980 by Maxwell Roberts

What does noted alternate transit map designer Maxwell Roberts do when he comes across a rare postcard version of the East Berlin S-Bahn network from 1980?

He takes a photo of it, and then recreates it using modern design tools, of course.

Remember that the S-Bahn was still operated by the GDR even in West Berlin, although West Berliners boycotted the service for the most part, preferring their own U-Bahn network. The Staatsgrenze (state border) totally dominates even this supposedly “unified” service map, and it’s clear in a number of places where the border has cut a rail line neatly in two. The only place where interchange between the two halves of the system was even remotely possible was at Friedrichstrasse, and even then only after rigorous border screening.

The map itself is quite lovely — much nicer than this more well-known map from around the same time — with bright rainbow colours, restrained European typography (an East German alternate cut of Futura, as the original typeface was not available there at the time!), and nice mode differentiation. 

Our rating: A superb restoration of an obscure but excellent map, both design-wise and historically. Five stars!

5 Stars!

Source: The Atlantic Cities

NYC Never Made: The First Plan for a High Line

bbrueggenyc:

image

Sometimes, it takes a while for an idea to successfully get off the ground. The firm Steven Holl Architects was a member of one of several design teams that submitted a design plan for the High Line park back in 2004. It wasn’t the first time the famous architect tackled…

washingtonpost:

silentgiantla:

Animated artwork by Rebecca Mock

Fine, detailed and subtle animated artwork created by New York illustrator Rebecca Mock. Apparently the animated gif back to stay, gradually more and more people are exploring this old format and customers asking for shouting. Several of these illustrations were created for the New York Times or The Warlus magazine.

Beautiful gif art. <3

(via npr)