Shit That I Come Across in New York

transitmaps:

Submission – Future/Fantasy High-Speed Rail Map of North America by Lukas (age 12)
Hi, my name is Lukas and I am 12 years old. I love to read your blog and other mapping blogs. I was looking online and i found a map of a hi-speed rail system for America designed by the government. I thought the system’s design was horrible, because it was made of isolated corridors and networks that were in no way connected to one another and had too many stations for smaller towns like Millbrae, California and Bakersfield, California. I drew this map of a made-up interconnected hi-speed rail system for the US and Canada. Average speeds would be around 180 mph, while top speeds would be 220 mph. I got my inspiration from the government map and my own travels on the TGV and Eurostar in France ( I am half-french ). Please rate the map and system, I think it is one of the best rail maps i have ever drawn!
Note: the map is slightly discolored, the Colonial ( east coast ) route is yellow and the Big Sky Zephyr ( Chicago to Seattle ) route is an orange-yellow color.
——
Transit Maps says:
Lukas becomes the youngest contributor to the site with this great hand-drawn map of his vision for high-speed rail in North America. He’s certainly set his sights high, with lines all the way across the USA and all the way up through Alaska to Fairbanks and through Canada up to Edmonton.
Lukas notes that the other high-speed rail maps for the US that he’s seen break things up into smaller unconnected corridors. Unfortunately, this is probably the only way that any sort of high-speed rail will ever be constructed here. The vast distances across the country, low ridership and the ease of air travel all conspire against long-distance HSR. France, by comparison, is much smaller. A trip from Paris to Nîmes in the south of France takes around three hours by TGV and covers a distance of some 400 miles – which is only about the same as the distance between Portland, Oregon and Boise, Idaho.
However, I have to say that I love this map: it’s creative, fun and well-drawn. Drawing a map like this by hand will put Lukas in good stead if he ever decides to try and make a map using a computer – it’s often a great idea to sketch things out first.
I particularly love the awesome names Lukas has used for his routes: some of them are very evocative of the areas they serve – the Fjordrunner up to Alaska is my favourite, while Big Sky Zephyr and Princess Alberta are positively poetic.
I’m not going to give this map a rating out of 5 – it’s not really possible to compare a hand-drawn map to professionally-made transit maps – but I will say that I think Lukas has shown great creativity, critical thinking and solid design skills with this map and should definitely keep making them. I look forward to seeing more!

transitmaps:

Submission – Future/Fantasy High-Speed Rail Map of North America by Lukas (age 12)

Hi, my name is Lukas and I am 12 years old. I love to read your blog and other mapping blogs. I was looking online and i found a map of a hi-speed rail system for America designed by the government. I thought the system’s design was horrible, because it was made of isolated corridors and networks that were in no way connected to one another and had too many stations for smaller towns like Millbrae, California and Bakersfield, California. I drew this map of a made-up interconnected hi-speed rail system for the US and Canada. Average speeds would be around 180 mph, while top speeds would be 220 mph. I got my inspiration from the government map and my own travels on the TGV and Eurostar in France ( I am half-french ). Please rate the map and system, I think it is one of the best rail maps i have ever drawn!

Note: the map is slightly discolored, the Colonial ( east coast ) route is yellow and the Big Sky Zephyr ( Chicago to Seattle ) route is an orange-yellow color.

——

Transit Maps says:

Lukas becomes the youngest contributor to the site with this great hand-drawn map of his vision for high-speed rail in North America. He’s certainly set his sights high, with lines all the way across the USA and all the way up through Alaska to Fairbanks and through Canada up to Edmonton.

Lukas notes that the other high-speed rail maps for the US that he’s seen break things up into smaller unconnected corridors. Unfortunately, this is probably the only way that any sort of high-speed rail will ever be constructed here. The vast distances across the country, low ridership and the ease of air travel all conspire against long-distance HSR. France, by comparison, is much smaller. A trip from Paris to Nîmes in the south of France takes around three hours by TGV and covers a distance of some 400 miles – which is only about the same as the distance between Portland, Oregon and Boise, Idaho.

However, I have to say that I love this map: it’s creative, fun and well-drawn. Drawing a map like this by hand will put Lukas in good stead if he ever decides to try and make a map using a computer – it’s often a great idea to sketch things out first.

I particularly love the awesome names Lukas has used for his routes: some of them are very evocative of the areas they serve – the Fjordrunner up to Alaska is my favourite, while Big Sky Zephyr and Princess Alberta are positively poetic.

I’m not going to give this map a rating out of 5 – it’s not really possible to compare a hand-drawn map to professionally-made transit maps – but I will say that I think Lukas has shown great creativity, critical thinking and solid design skills with this map and should definitely keep making them. I look forward to seeing more!

fuckyeahbrutalism:

Town Hall, Bat Yam, Israel, 1959-63
(Alfred Neumann, Zvi Hecker and Eldar Sharon)

fuckyeahbrutalism:

Town Hall, Bat Yam, Israel, 1959-63

(Alfred Neumann, Zvi Hecker and Eldar Sharon)

arquigraph:

The People’s Architect: Piet Blom

“Architecture is more than creating a place to live”, stated the late Dutch architect, Piet Blom, “you create a society” .

Till his death in 1999, Blom designed homes and urban schemes as if to reject the stern, coldness of post-war Modernism in light of a warmer, more human architecture.. via @archdaily

Images courtesy of Piet Blom Museum , via Archdaily

(via loveyousomat)

archi-diary:

Sharifi-ha House

NEXTOFFICE – ALIREZA TAGHABONI

manpodcast:

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist and organizer Mary Miss.

Miss is the founder of City as Living Laboratory, an organization that provides a platform for artists, scientists, planners, policy makers and the general public to be more environmentally aware. In conjunction with Marfa Dialogues St. Louis, a program of the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, Miss will be leading a walk through central Saint Louis on August 2. Marfa Dialogues St. Louis events run from July 30 through August 3. 

This post features an earthwork Miss created in 1975. She and host Tyler Green discussed it on this week’s program. The first three images here are drawings Miss created of the work. They are followed by the untitled piece as it is installed on the grounds of the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College in Ohio. The drawings and the work are all in AMAM’s collection. The bottom image is a Google Satellite picture that shows where the work is installed.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

fuckyeahbrutalism:

KQED Studios, San Francisco, California, 1968
(John M. Johansen with George T. Rockrise & Associates)

fuckyeahbrutalism:

KQED Studios, San Francisco, California, 1968

(John M. Johansen with George T. Rockrise & Associates)

wnyc:

What are the odds this Brooklyn KFC is actually hooking up the acid?
—Sean, Sideshow
(via)

wnyc:

What are the odds this Brooklyn KFC is actually hooking up the acid?

—Sean, Sideshow

(via)